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Japan Finishes Third in Medal Count at Samsun Deaflympics

Japan finished 3rd in the medal count at the 23rd Summer Deaflympics in Samsun, Turkey this week, winning 2 gold, 2 silver and 2 bronze medals. The golds both came in men's sprints, with Maki Yamada winning the 200 m before returning to lead the 4x100 m relay team to gold. Five other Japanese athletes finished just out of the medals in 4th, all but one behind Russia athletes unrestricted from competing by the current IAAF ban. Russia dominated the medals with 21 gold, 8 silvers and 14 bronze, Kenya a distant 2nd with 5 gold, 5 silver and 6 bronze medals. Results of all Japanese finalists over the week:

23rd Summer Deaflympics

Samsun, Turkey, July 23-29, 2017
click here for complete results

Women's 100 m Final (-1.9 m/s)
1. Suslaidy Girat Rivero (Cuba) - 12.40
2. Beryl Wamira (Kenya) - 12.59
3. Marina Grishina (Russia) - 12.66
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4. Ayaka Komatsu (Japan) - 12.68

Men's 100 m Final (-0.9 m/s)
1. Dmytro Vyshynskyi (Ukraine) - 10.96
2. Hashem Yadegari (Iran) - 10.97
3. Nicholas Jones (U.S.A.) - 11.02
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7. Takuma Sasaki (Japan) - 11.30

Men's 200 m Final (-3.1 m/s)
1. Maki Yamada (Japan) - 22.30
2. Dmytro Vyshynskyi (Ukraine) - 22.62
3. Taylor Koss (U.S.A.) - 22.71

Men's 400 m Final
1. Yasin Suzen (Turkey) - 47.03 - MR
2. Maki Yamada (Japan) - 48.10
3. Dmytro Rudenko (Ukraine) - 48.25

Women's 800 m Final
1. Iuliia Abubiakirova (Russia) - 2:13.72
2. Diana Solodova (Russia) - 2:15.09
3. Ekaterina Kudriavtseva (Russia) - 2:15.26
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6. Mio Okada (Japan) - 2:22.35

Men's 800 m Final
1. Aliaksandr Charniak (Belarus) - 1:53.81
2. Mooyong Lee (South Korea) - 1:54.54
3. Jaime Martinez Morga (Spain) - 1:54.58
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DQ - Yuya Morimitsu (Japan)

Women's 1500 m Final
1. Diana Solodova (Russia) - 4:31.58
2. Halina Kozich (Belarus) - 4:33.08
3. Anastasiia Sydorenko (Ukraine) - 4:34.03
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7. Mio Okada (Japan) - 4:50.25

Men's 1500 m Final
1. John Koech (Kenya) - 3:48.95 - MR
2. Aliaksandr Charniak (Belarus) - 3:49.70
3. Symon Cherono (Kenya) - 3:49.94
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7. Yuya Morimitsu (Japan) - 3:55.85

Men's 5000 m Final
1. Symon Cherono (Kenya) - 14:06.01
2. Michael Letting (Kenya) - 14:58.49
3. Daniel Kiptum (Kenya) - 15:08.43
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11. Koichiro Yamanaka (Japan) - 18:21.31

Men's 10000 m Final
1. Symon Cherono (Kenya) - 29:11.73 - MR
2. Daniel Kiptum (Kenya) - 29:42.13
3. Peter Wareng (Kenya) - 29:59.28
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5. Kohichiro Yamanaka (Japan) - 33:28.75

Women's Marathon
1. Nele Alder-Baerens (Germany) - 2:51:19 - MR
2. Marila Svynobii (Ukraine) - 3:12:53
3. Sang Oh (South Korea) - 3:16:27
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7. Yuko Shimada (Japan) - 3:35:48

Men's Marathon
1. Daniel Kiptum (Kenya) - 2:25:07
2. Peter Wareng (Kenya) - 2:29:02
3. Davi Muriuki (Kenya) - 2:29:18
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4. Kohichiro Yamanaka (Japan) - 2:38:43
9. Toshiyuki Yoshida (Japan) - 2:50:02

Women's 100 m Hurdles Final (-1.2 m/s)
1. Janna Vandermeulen (U.S.A.) - 14.29
2. Yuliia Shapoval (Ukraine) - 14.50
3. Anastasia Klechkina (Russia) - 14.80
-----
7. Sayuri Tai (Japan) - 16.92

Women's 400 m Hurdles Final
1. Asya Khaladzhan (Russia) - 1:00.22 - WR
2. Viktoriia Kochmaryk (Ukraine) - 1:00.93
3. Janna Vandermeulen (U.S.A.) - 1:01.35
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5. Ayaka Komatsu (Japan) - 1:03.67

Men's 400 m Hurdles Final
1. Alan Tyshenko (Russia) - 52.83
2. Konstantin Grebenshchikov (Russia) - 52.90
3. Taylor Koss (U.S.A.) - 53.75
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8. Yuji Takada (Japan) - 59.68

Men's 4x100 m Relay Final
1. Japan - 41.66
2. Ukraine - 41.77
3. China - 42.03
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DNF - U.S.A.

Men's 4x400 m Relay Final
1. Russia - 3:13.39
2. Ukraine - 3:16.92
3. Turkey - 3:17.80
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5. Japan - 3:19.29

Men's High Jump Final
1. Denis Fedorenokov (Russia) - 2.13 m - WR
2. Raman Hralko (Belarus) - 2.07 m
3. Konstantin Khilenko (Russia) - 1.99 m
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5. Hiroyuki Maejima (Japan) - 1.90 m

Women's Long Jump Final
1. Marina Grishina (Russia) - 5.96 m - wind-aided
2. Suslaidy Girat Rivero (Cuba) - 5.95 m
3. Angela Alemseitova (Russia) - 5.73 m
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10. Maho Tanioka (Japan) - 4.88 m

Women's Pole Vault Final
1. Maria Nechaeva (Russia) - 3.45 m - WR
2. Ekaterina Nikiforova (Russia) - 3.30 m
3. Kanako Takizawa (Japan) - 2.55 m
-----
NM - Marino Sato (Japan)

Men's Pole Vault Final
1. Kirill Fillipov (Russia) - 4.81 m - MR
2. Dmitriy Kochkarov (Russia) - 4.60 m
3. Chung-Yu Chen (Taiwan) - 4.60 m
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4. Kotaro Takehana (Japan) - 4.50 m

Men's Triple Jump Final
1. Ivan Pakin (Russia) - 15.41 m
2. Raman Hralko (Belarus) - 15.13 m
3. Volodymyr Danylchenko (Ukraine) - 15.08 m
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7. Kodai Nakamura (Japan) - 13.62 m

Women's Javelin Throw Final
1. Laura Stefanac (Croatia) - 49.20 m - MR
2. An-Yi Hsu (Taiwan) - 46.80 m
3. Anastasia Mamlina (Russia) - 45.68 m
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6. Nagisa Takahashi (Japan) - 37.67 m

Men's Javelin Throw Final
1. Shun Xin (China) - 66.63 m
2. Theodor Thor (Sweden) - 66.58 m
3. Jesus Garcia Abreu (Venezuela) - 64.79 m
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4. Kenta Sato (Japan) - 63.72 m
8. Masamitsu Sato (Japan) - 59.51 m

Men's Discus Throw Final
1. Sajjad Piraygharchaman (Iran) - 57.04 m
2. Masateru Yugami (Japan) - 55.58 m
3. Dmitry Kalmykov (Russia) - 55.25 m

Women's Hammer Throw Final
1. Trude Raad (Norway) - 66.35 m - WR
2. Rymma Filimoshikina (Ukraine) - 61.74 m
3. Yuliia Kysylova (Ukraine) - 61.54 m
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5. Mayu Murao (Japan) - 48.94 m

Men's Hammer Throw Final
1. Maxim Bgan (Russia) - 60.97 m
2. Muhammed Cakir (Turkey) - 55.91 m
3. Takamasa Ishida (Japan) - 53.40 m

Men's Decathlon
1. Maxim Kulikov (Russia) - 6256
2. Konstantin Khilenko (Russia) - 6192
3. Kirill Tsybizov (Russia) - 5661
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4. Hiroyuki Maejima (Japan) - 5027

© 2017 Brett Larner, all rights reserved

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